Designing with Holograms

Advancements in technology have transcended the limits of discovery and innovation in the world of modern healthcare, not only in terms of scientific discovery but also in the way hospitals do business. Physician and hospital personnel have incorporated technology into their everyday routine by switching over to electronic medical records and scheduling. We are living longer, finding cures to the so-called “incurable” and designing new and improved techniques to teach the next generation of doctors because of these recent developments.

One of the latest technological advancements that may change the way we design healthcare space is the partnership between global medical technology company, Stryker and Microsoft. The two companies have teamed up to create a new method of designing operating rooms. Using Microsoft HoloLens and Stryker software, hospitals can better visualize plans for their new operating room with 3D holograms. No more need to push and move around expensive and heavy equipment to see the design of the room. With the HoloLens you can move and shape the equipment with the pinch of two fingers to create an operating room that satisfies the needs of all departments.

In addition to making healthcare architecture more efficient, Case Western Reserve University and the Cleveland Clinic have been using it to teach the next generation of physicians human anatomy in completely new ways. Students can see human anatomy layer by layer by isolating specific systems and organs. For example, students are able to gain a deeper understanding of the inner workings of a heart before ever opening a human chest. We are excited about the Stryker and Microsoft HoloLens technology and the possibilities it creates for medical teaching and scientific discovery.

For more information on this promising new technology click here.

Promising New Treatment for Sepsis

Sepsis is a life-threatening condition associated with an inflammatory response to infection that has the potential to cause multiple organ failure. Sepsis kills more people in the hospital than any other disease. Worldwide, Sepsis is estimated to impact 15 to 19 million people annually with a mortality rate approaching 60% in low income countries.

Many people in the scientific and medical communities are hoping that the findings of Dr. Paul Marik in the Journal Chest will revolutionize the treatment of Sepsis. Dr. Marik, working from preliminary research findings by Dr. Berry Fowler and his colleagues at the Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) in Richmond, began treating septic patients with an intravenous cocktail of vitamin C, low dose of corticosteroids, and thiamine (another vitamin).

After Dr. Marik treated 50 patients, he submitted his results to Chest. Of 47 patients treated with the vitamin C cocktail, only four died in the hospital. Of the four deaths, all were from their underlying diseases – not from sepsis. For a control, Dr. Marik looked back at 47 septic patients treated previously in his hospital without vitamin C infusion and found that 19 had died. While the data is still suggestive, the outlook is promising.

Dr. Fowler and his laboratory at VCU was recently awarded a $3.2 million grant from the NIH to run a controlled study to examine the use of vitamin C to treat sepsis. The study will be conducted at several universities and be double-blinded (information about the test kept from the testers and participants) as to limit bias, both intentional or unconscious.

We are excited about the potential of this research and the tremendous potential this will have on both patients and the healthcare industry.

We learned of the success and studies from NPR, in their article Doctor Turns Up Possible Treatment for Deadly Sepsis.

“Behavioral Health Is Part of Overall Health”

“Behavioral Health is part of overall Health,” said Debra Osteen, NAPHS board chair and president of behavioral health, Universal Health Services, Inc. at the start of the recent NAPHS Annual Meeting in Washington, DC. This statement came as no surprise to the many Mental Health professionals attending this yearly conference.

Speaker after speaker talked about the state of mental health care today and the need to seamlessly integrate Mental Health services into the overall medical care provided by family practice physicians and patient care facilities of all types. Because of “parity” legislation passed in congress in 2008 and the passage just last year of legislation for $1B funding  for mental health care for 2017 and 2018, one would have thought a mood of jubilation or at least a sense of well-being would have been present in the conference hall of the Mandarin Oriental Hotel Conference Center.  Instead, the general mood was one of despondence.

The increasing effects of the opioid pandemic are on the minds of all health care professionals. The number of baby boomers who are aging and will need increasing medical services is clear to everyone. Yet, no one knows or can accurately predict how the repeal of the ACA and the proposals for new Republican health care legislation currently being debated in the House of Representatives will affect the future delivery of health care services in America. Various presenters spoke about how funding for Medicaid will be decimated, how future Medicare changes might likely come about, how billions of dollars will be removed from the budget for health care and how millions of Americans will lose access to services. One questioner, at a lunch session presentation by Hemi Tewarson, acting director for National Governors Association Center for Best Practices, Health Division stated, “No matter how you slice and dice it, Congress is proposing to remove $800 B from the budget for healthcare services and nothing is being proposed to replace it.  How then are we, the health care professionals, going to deliver services to the most needy or to anyone, for that matter? ” General applause greeted this question. And no real answer was forthcoming.

Cancer Death Rates Fall

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E4H was elated to read the number of deaths from cancer in the United States have dropped 25 percent since hitting a peak in 1991. The report, issued by the American Cancer Society, hit home for a lot of us.

This drop means that 2.1 million fewer people died from cancer between 1991 and 2014 than would have died if cancer death rates had remained at their 1991 level, the researchers said. As mothers, fathers, sisters, brothers and children, we appreciate what a big deal this is for families across the world.

The continuing drops in the cancer death rate are a powerful sign of the potential we have to reduce cancer’s deadly toll,” Dr. Otis Brawley, the chief medical officer of the American Cancer Society, said in a statement. “Continuing that success will require more clinical and basic research to improve early detection and treatment, as well as strategies to increase healthy behaviors nationwide.”

We are proud of our work with both healthcare providers and researchers who work to fight the many forms of this disease.

This story was originally reported in LiveScience

 

Tracking Cancer

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New research out in American Chemical Society (ACS) Nano suggests the approach to tracking cancers may be on the verge of revolution. Liposomes, tiny fatty envelopes, are often used to package anti-cancer drugs as they tend to congregate around loosely bound tumor cells as a matter of biophysics.

Rafael de Rosales of King’s College, London, and Alberto Gabizon of the Shaare Zedek Medical Centre in Jerusalem have treated mice with liposomes doped with radioactive metal ions and shown the special liposomes congregate around an animals’ tumor. What is special about this finding is that these supped up liposomes are visible by positron-emission tomogoraphy (PET) scanning and therefore assist physicians in following the course of drugs.

This new discovery has the potential to assist physicians in better understanding how to target cancers with missile like efficiency. The Economist published an article on this research originally published by ACS Nano.

We are excited by the progress being made in laboratories around the world to fight cancer. We feel privileged to be able to support institutions in making such remarkable strides in life sciences.

New Bone Regeneration Study

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The Shah Tissue Engineering and Additive Manufacturing (TEAM) Lab recently published an article in Science Translational Medicine describing their breakthrough in bone regeneration engineering.

Shah’s lab bioengineered a new hyperelastic “bone” material that is cheap, versatile and easy to print. This invention has the potential to revolutionize the repair or regeneration of bones.

Interestingly, when TEAM placed human bone marrow stem cells on a sample of hyperelastic “bone,” its presence was enough to stimulate them to mature into bone cells. The new material served as a scaffold for the cells to form their own natural materials.

Popular Science originally reported on this breakthrough. In the article they quote coauthor Ramille Shah of Northwestern University,“I think ideally it would be great if we could have these printers in a hospital setting where we can provide them the hyperelastic ‘bone’ ink and then they can then make patient specific implants that day—within 24 hours,” Shah said.

This new material has tremendous potential to revolutionize the way bone injuries are treated in the future. We are excited by the thoughtful and applicable research coming out of higher education.