Wentworth-Douglass Hospital Site Visit

E4H aims to expose staff of all phases of architecture including the working construction sites. Every so often, we’ll gather a team to head out to a current project site for a visit. While on site, we’ll review lessons learned, common construction practices, as well as any interesting or unique items specific to that project.

Recently a group from the Boston office visited the Wentworth Douglass Pease MOB sites, in Portsmouth, NH. The group toured two MOB buildings in various stages of construction. Building A is a 2-Storied 25,000 SF building that is roughly 80% complete. Building B is a 3-Storied 60,000 SF building that is roughly 30% complete. Below are the lessons learned from the site visit.

“This site visit enhanced my understanding of the reality of design when implemented during construction. It reminded me of the importance of communication for successful integration of the different building elements and building systems. Having the opportunity to see two buildings in very different phases of construction was eye opening for me. It was like seeing an X-ray of an evolving building because we got to see the “veins” and “guts” that come together to create the exterior walls, the interior walls, and the floors in one building and then we got to see it further along in the other building.

We had the chance to speak to the project superintendent about the coordination it took to construct the space for a linear accelerator. On the design front, we learned that a Physicist was consulted to aid in calculating the thickness and construction of the envelope needed for this space and that there are special lasers that are used with this machine that require an extremely carefully laid out and constructed room for them to work properly. To implement the construction and design required for this space, coordination between the design and construction teams was essential to its success. To me this was not only fascinating but a perfect example of the importance of communication in the healthcare design and construction industry.”

– Kimberly Leonard, LEED GA, project coordinator

“This was a great opportunity to share the day to day activities on a construction site with our younger staff, who would not normally be introduced to a project at this phase until later in their careers.  Observing projects during construction gives a greater appreciation for the effort needed to design, draw, and coordinate thoroughly.  Everything included (or not included) within the drawings and specifications makes its way to the construction site.  It is a good reminder that a project is not finished once the construction documents have been completed.”

– Ray Boudreau, project manager

“It was great to visit the two sites and seeing the projects in their respective stages. I’ve never been to a project site so early in the construction phase as Building A, so it was definitely eye-opening to see how much coordination our projects require from the start, even before the interior walls are even laid out. It was also interesting to learn about the how the future growth of the building was accounted for in the design, as well as how the exterior building finishes were an impact.

Since Building B was much further along, the most beneficial part of this visit was to see the details that we draw in 2D back at the office installed in real life. Other lessons included materials transitions (and how to clarify trouble points on our drawings) and a review of what to check for during punch lists.”

– Marissa Walczak, interior designer

“After the transition from the familiar theoretical realm of learning in school to now seeing firsthand the Wentworth-Douglass Hospital Pease project under construction is certainly an exciting new way to understand the development of design and construction. While walking through the site and hearing from fellow co-workers on how they addressed and reviewed certain challenges was remarkable. It seems that every site will offer a few lessons and to enhance our skills.”

– Shannon McManus, project coordinator